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5 Things to Know in Montana for July 22

 

July 21, 2014



Your daily look at news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today.

JUDGE TO BE CENSURED OVER RAPE VICTIM COMMENTS:

The Montana Supreme Court on Tuesday will publicly reprimand a judge who gave a lenient sentence to a rapist after suggesting the 14-year-old victim shared some of the responsibility for the crime. District Judge G. Todd Baugh of Billings is scheduled to appear before the court in Helena, where one of the justices will read a censure statement prepared in advance. Baugh will likely have an opportunity to address the court, and the censure will then go into the record, Supreme Court clerk Ed Smith said.

SUSPECTS IN INTERSTATE SHOOTING ARRESTED:

A man and a woman suspected in a shooting on Interstate 90 in western Montana have been arrested in a Seattle motel. The Missoula County Attorney's Office said Monday that 30-year-old Troy Anthony Miller and 34-year-old Katherine Grace Evans were arrested on warrants for attempted deliberate homicide and robbery. Police say a man was shot during a robbery along the highway near Turah on Wednesday night. The man survived, but his name and condition have not been released.

WOMAN, INFANT SON FOUND IN UTAH:

A woman and her infant son have been found in Utah a month after she fled from a Montana hospital. Police say 29-year-old Michelle Yallup of Anaconda fled with her son after they both tested positive for methamphetamines. Yallup was arrested and charged with endangering the welfare of a child.

FORMER LAWMAKER SENTENCED FOR SELLING UNLICENSED SECURITIES:

A former state lawmaker who pleaded guilty to selling securities in Montana without a license has been given a six-year deferred sentence and ordered to repay his victims the nearly $336,000 they lost. District Judge Mike Menahan sentenced William R. Nooney of Missoula last week in Helena. Nooney was charged last September and pleaded guilty in April.

COURT UPHOLDS DRUG PROGRAM CONFIDENTIALITY:

The Montana Supreme Court says authorities can't file new criminal charges against a person using confidential information obtained in a drug treatment court program. The court ruled that using that information violates the U.S. and Montana constitutions' protections against self-incrimination.

 

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